Is Your Teen Lazy? Or is it Biology?

For many parents, waking their teenage kid up for school can be one of the most exhausting parts of their day. And if you’re one of these parents, you’ll understand the amount of nudging, shaking and alarm-ringing it takes to wake a sleepy school-going teen.

But are teenagers really as lazy as their morning routines suggest? Or is there more than meets the eye?

According to science, the problem may not lie with your teen – but rather, their school hours.

Your Teenager’s Biological Clock Ticks Differently

You see, there’s one aspect of puberty that few people realise – your child’s biological clock actually shifts back by as much as three hours! So starting school at 7.30am feels to them, like how starting work at 4.30am is to you. (Simply put, it can feel dreadfully early.)

In fact, some groups have already recommended that schools start no earlier than 8.30am.

The advantages of doing so include:


When schools start too early, these issues become more commonplace:

Can Later School Times Work in Singapore?

Before you go, “Oh, this will never happen in Singapore. Our system is too rigid!” You may be interested to know that a trial was conducted on our sunny island.

For nine months, 400 students from Nanyang Girls High started school 45 minutes later (than other secondary schools). Researchers tracked the students and gathered feedback, and the results were incredibly positive!


The Downsides?
There are, admittedly, some downsides to have schools start later.


The Bottom Line: Teenagers Need Restful Sleep
Whether or not we see school start times shift later in the morning, what’s undeniable is that better sleep leads to teens who are more focused, happier and do better at school.

One way to ensure your teen has more restful nights is with a quality latex mattress that’s the perfect mix of comfort and support. And of course, instilling a good habit of sleeping at a regular time every night.